Sydney Morning Herald from Sydney, New South Wales on March 15, 1990

Sydney Morning Herald from Sydney, New South Wales on March 15, 1990

Loading...
  • 508. The International Brotherhood of Electrical Worker (IBEW 10 best No Bra Club images on Pinterest | Bra, Channel and Red , Ekskluziff Wańka WstańkaORIGINAL PENGUIN Reversible Hooded Ratner, Nightshade | ModeSens , Vestes & manteaux : Marque de mode Vêtements pour Hommes et Femmaangenaam Adidas Originals | Korting Junior ZX Flux Trainer , Hot Sale Nike Alliance 550 Puffer Parka Jacket | Black M60x4731 Stay warm this winter with the Ellesse Cuffed Bobble Hat & LazzaTents , British Royal Air Force RAF WW2 SPITFIRE PILOT WEBLEY REVOLVER , The British Approach to Low Intensity Operations: Part II , London Standard Newspaper Archives, Jun 17, 1891 , Corruption and Illegal Laws in Ireland | Trust Law | Government , Tender Echoes – Aarden Authors , 148 best ROCK on Minimalist Musical Posters ! images on Pinteres , Takealot: Online Shopping | SA s leading online storeLowest price Fashion The North Face Tonnerro Jacket for Men TNF , Criminal Damage | Criminal Damage Jersey Bomber Jacket In Grey C , Buy Women s coats and jackets Ellesse from the Next UK online s8aa1245347a6dd64a2c41650e74fd598d559c67ec7e3456e2771b31298f0e48494 best vintage clothes images on Pinterest | Clothes, Clothing Coats + Jackets | WOMEN | Forever 21 , 21 best Toys images on Pinterest | Custom bikes, Custom motorcycMeest Gezocht Yoors | Meest Gezocht YoorsGroothandelsprijs Kinderen Hooded Tops, Converse , GLORIOUS GANGSTA Paolo Sweatshirt | FOOTASYLUM x Get The Look , Uitkrant Mei 2015 by Amsterdam Marketing issuuNEW IN | Catwalkjunkie , Homepage
  • Sydney Morning Herald from Sydney, New South Wales on March 15, 1990

    HOME 2017-10-17T23:42:42+00:00
    Egypt’s Ancient Capital

    Welcome to Memphis, Egypt’s first capital city and a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Memphis was once a vast settlement, with magnificent temples, palaces and ports.

    Rulers of Egypt were buried in pyramids near to the city. Without Memphis, the world famous Pyramids of Giza may never have existed!

    Sydney Morning Herald from Sydney, New South Wales on March 15,

    The temples of Memphis were some of the most important in Ancient Egypt. The only other ancient Egyptian city that you could compare it to would be Thebes (Luxor). Yet today we know far less about Memphis.

    Soon, for the first time, you will be able to explore seven newly opened sites of this once bustling ancient city. Until then, you can visit a large collection of impressive statues, sphinxes and sarcophagi in the Memphis Open-Air Museum.

    Unlike many sites in Egypt, much of Memphis has not been rebuilt. Its temples, chapels and tombs can be seen as they would have looked when first uncovered by archaeologists.

    Sydney Morning Herald from Sydney, New South Wales on March 15, 1990Open Air Museum
    Incredible artefacts can be found here, including Egypt’s second largest Sphinx and a colossal statue of Ramesses II.

    Read more >

    Ramesses II Chapel
    Discovered by accident, this small chapel was frequently reused over time and has many interesting stories to tell.

    Read more >

    Hathor Temple
    Beautiful tops of columns carved into the shape of the goddess Hathor’s head can be seen at this unique temple.

    Read more >

    Ramesses II Temple
    Detailed inscriptions and carvings cover the walls of this temple. It was once the private sanctuary of Ramesses II himself.

    Read more >

    Seti I Chapel
    This partially reconstructed chapel has examples of what were, at the time, some of the most beautiful inscriptions in all of Egypt.

    Read more >

    Tombs of the High Priests
    These tombs belonged to four members of the same family and have an unusual two-storey design with a triangular roof.

    Read more >

    nike Apis House
    This unique embalming house was where the Apis Bull was mummified on giant alabaster beds which are still in place today.

    Read more >

    Ptah Temple
    A vast field of ruins is all the remains of this enormous gate that once allowed access to the Great Temple of Ptah.

    Read more >

    Sydney Morning Herald from Sydney, New South Wales on March 15, 1990